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In Australian Vote, Prime Minister Concedes To Abbott

In Australia's just-concluded national vote, conservative Tony Abbott has won enough support to become the country's next prime minister and end six years of Labor rule. That's the analysis from the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, which reports that voters' main issues were the economy and repeal of carbon and mining taxes.

The election comes months after Julia Gillard, 51, Australia's first female prime minister, lost the support of her party. Labor replaced her with Kevin Rudd, who had preceded Gillard as prime minister. But the party failed to show a unity of purpose, according to many analysts.

Rudd conceded defeat on Saturday, The Sydney Morning Herald reports.

A former Rhodes scholar who leads the Liberal-National coalition, Abbott benefited from "the strident support of Rupert Murdoch's newspapers," the BBC says.

He has "promised to restore political stability, cut taxes and crack down on asylum seekers arriving by boat," according to Reuters.

Abbott was also the target of a famously ferocious speech by Gillard in 2012, when she called him a misogynist who had repeatedly offended her and all the women in Australia, as The Two-Way reported.

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Barbershop: UofL Basketball Ban, Football Concussions And The NFL Women's Summit

ESPN contributor Kevin Blackistone, Bloomberg View's Kavitha Davidson and The Washington Post's Wesley Lowery talk about the UofL basketball team, public opinion of the NFL, and women in sports.
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After Introducing Changes, Keurig Sales Continue To Fall

Despite America's high coffee consumption, Keurig reported disappointing sales this week. Even during its popular holiday selling period, the numbers haven't perked up in recent years.
NPR

On The Clock: Rubio Gets The Most Talking Time In Tonight's Debate

It was the last debate before the New Hampshire primary and Donald Trump was back onstage. Which GOP candidate ended up with the most talking time?
NPR

How Limited Internet Access Can Subtract From Kids' Education

Smartphones are often credited with helping bridge the "digital divide" between people who do and don't have Internet access at home. But is mobile Internet enough for a family with a kid in school?

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