WAMU 88.5 : News

Syrian-American Group Says Delaying Strikes Bolsters Opposition

Play associated audio

As the U.S. Senate starts debate over the possible authorization of military force against the Assad regime of Syria, local Syrian-Americans are speaking out.

A recent Reuters poll shows a majority of Americans still oppose U.S. military intervention into the Syrian civil war, even after last week's chemical weapons attack on civilians. On the other hand, some Syrian-Americans suggest President Obama's pledge to strike the Assad regime pending congressional authorization falls short of their expectation.

Daniel Layman, spokesperson for the Washington, D.C.-based Syrian Support Group says the SSG believes the president's delay in attacking Syria could help incubate the agenda of extremists in that country.

"Immediately after Obama's remarks, we started getting reports of extremist groups increasing their recruitment efforts and starting smear campaigns in Syria, telling people that anyone who remains hopeful for U.S. support has betrayed the revolutionary cause, and betrayed the Syrian nation," Layman says.

The Senate began hearings Tuesday and the House of Representatives is expected to begin debate when the full chamber returns next week. Layman says the sooner the better.

"Extremist elements remain small within the opposition, but opportunities like this give them the chance to grow," Layman says.

Calls to the Syrian embassy in Washington, D.C. requesting comment were not returned.

NPR

Not My Job: We Quiz Lena Headey On Games Worse Than 'Game Of Thrones'

Game of Thrones may have killed off many major characters, but the manipulative, scheming Queen Cersei is still standing. We've invited Headey to play a game called "You win and you die."
NPR

After Introducing Changes, Keurig Sales Continue To Fall

Despite America's high coffee consumption, Keurig reported disappointing sales this week. Even during its popular holiday selling period, the numbers haven't perked up in recent years.
NPR

Do Political TV Ads Still Work?

TV ads are a tried-and-true way for politicians to get their message out. But in this chaotic presidential primary, are they still effective?
NPR

Twitter Says It Has Shut Down 125,000 Terrorism-Related Accounts

The announcement comes just weeks after a woman sued Twitter, saying the platform knowingly let ISIS use the network "to spread propaganda, raise money and attract recruits."

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.