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Charles Lollar Joins Crowded Maryland GOP Gubernatorial Primary

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Charles Lollar spoke to a group of supporters in Silver Spring, Md., on Tuesday.
Matt Bush
Charles Lollar spoke to a group of supporters in Silver Spring, Md., on Tuesday.

Another Republican has officially joined the race to be the next governor of Maryland: Charles Lollar.

Lollar was in the Marines for 16 years and been a businessman for nearly the same amount of time. He's currently an executive with Cintas Corporation, but wants his next job to be governor of Maryland.

Lollar is touring the state this week to roll out his campaign, complete with a stump speech saying he wants to move beyond racial, gender, and social status politics.

"We want a taxpayer's bill of rights," Lollar says. "We cannot grow in Annapolis the size of our state government any faster than the cost of living and people's everyday paychecks."

Lollar is trying to become the first African-American governor in Maryland, just like Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown, who's running on the Democratic side.

Three other Republicans have already declared their candidacies, with a handful of others still deciding.

The primary election is next June


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