NPR : News

Radiocative Water Leak At Fukushima Worse Than First Thought

Radiation surrounding Japan's crippled Fukushima nuclear plant has increased 18 fold following a report last month that radioactive water had leaked into the ground around the plant, which was badly damaged in the 2011 earthquake and tsunami.

Tokyo Electric Power Co., which owns the Dai-Ichi Fukushima plant, reports that radiation around the site is at 1,800 millisieverts per hour, a level that Reuters says is "enough to kill an exposed person in four hours."

Previously, the utility, also known as Tepco, said the leaking water was at around 100 millisieverts per hour.

The BBC says:

"In addition, Tepco says it has discovered a leak on another pipe emitting radiation levels of 230 millisieverts an hour.

The plant has seen a series of water leaks and power failures."

Fukushima lost power when the 2011 tsunami smashed ashore causing a cascading effect that damaged the reactor's cooling system and sent workers scrambling to mitigate radiation leaks.

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'Never Crossing The Botox Rubicon': Amanda Peet Explores Aging In Hollywood

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When It Came To Food, Neanderthals Weren't Exactly Picky Eaters

During the Ice Age, it seems Neanderthals tended to chow down on whatever was most readily available. Early humans, on the other hand, maintained a consistent diet regardless of environmental changes.
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Donald Trump Delivers Keynote At California GOP Convention

Donald Trump gave the keynote address Friday afternoon at the California Republican convention. He's trying to lock-up the party's presidential nomination, and California could put him over the top.
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Apple's Lousy Week Could Signal Times Of Trouble For Tech Giant

Apple got hit with a lot of bad news this week. First, the company posted its first quarterly revenue drop since 2003. And then billionaire activist investor Carl Icahn revealed that he has dumped all of his shares in Apple. NPR explores whether the company is really in trouble or if is this all just a bump in the road.

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