Norton Faults Secret Service For Long Lines At March On Washington | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Norton Faults Secret Service For Long Lines At March On Washington

Play associated audio

D.C. Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton is demanding answers from the Secret Service about long lines that kept people out of this week's March on Washington remembrance.

Wednesday was that perfect D.C. summer mix of off and on rain and sticky heat, making the day a little miserable for many, but not miserable enough to deter tens of thousands of people from coming out to the Lincoln Memorial.

But many people who were undeterred by nature gave up on the March after being stuck in an incredibly slow moving Secret Service checkpoint that left some people hospitalized, according to Norton who says security planning was a massive failure. She says the Secret Service has shown it can't handle security at large events alone.

"They could only have benefited from other police agencies being allowed to help, like the Capitol Police, like the Park Police," says Norton. "Without that help and without advanced planning, they've shown they don't know how to do it. I no longer have confidence in them when it comes to the public, at least in our nation's capital."

Norton is hoping to meet with officials at the Secret Service next week.

NPR

Book Review: 'Angels Make Their Hope Here'

Alan Cheuse reviews Angels Make Their Hope Here, by Breena Clarke.
NPR

Fruit Recall Hits Trader Joe's, Costco, Wal-Mart Stores

The recall applies to "certain lots of whole peaches (white and yellow), nectarines (white and yellow), plums and pluots" from a California packing company, the FDA says.
NPR

On Immigration, America's Concerns Are Fiery But Fleeting

In a recent Gallup poll, most named immigration the biggest problem confronting the nation. But past periods of heightened worries have been brief — and haven't brought about solutions.
NPR

9/11 Commission Issues An Update On Anniversary Of Report

Saying that the world has changed "dramatically," the report's authors write that al-Qaida groups have spread, and the threat for cyberterrorism has grown.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.