WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Alexandria Superintendent Expected To Step Down

Play associated audio
Superintendent of Alexandria City Public Schools Morton Sherman is expected to submit his resignation to the School Board.
Connection Newspapers
Superintendent of Alexandria City Public Schools Morton Sherman is expected to submit his resignation to the School Board.

Superintendent of Alexandria City Public Schools Morton Sherman is expected to submit his resignation to the School Board.

Ever since he became superintendent in 2008, Sherman has been a lightning rod for controversy. Critics say he has a hard-charging leadership style. Supporters say he was willing to take on big challenges.

Last year, he found himself under intense pressure to step down after an auditor's report discovered a "dysfunctional environment" in the budget office — and the vice mayor at the time called for his resignation during a City Council meeting. But members of the School Board stood by the embattled superintendent and gave him a new three-year contract.

"He was putting a lot of resources toward the students of color," says Evelin Urrutia, an education organizer for Tenants and Workers United. "So we just hope that the School Board, looking for a new person to come and take his spot, also is going to be looking at those qualities."

Sherman has two years left on his contract, which means the newly elected School Board members are expected to start negotiating some kind of buyout. The superintendent has an annual salary of $265,000 a year.

NPR

Long Before Burning Man, Zozobra Brought Fire And Redemption To The Desert

For decades, residents in Santa Fe, N.M., have gathered to burn a massive puppet — but only after stuffing it with symbols of their woes. It's a way to release the past year's sadness and start anew.
NPR

Sunday Sports: Baseball Season Stats

As the baseball season enters the homestretch, Mike Pesca, host of The Gist podcast shares obscure baseball stats and somewhat dubious accomplishments with NPR's Rachel Martin.
NPR

If The FCC Gets It Way, This App Could Change The Way You Watch TV And Save Dollars

Michel Martin chats with NPR's Washington correspondent Brian Naylor about the FCC's scheduled vote this week on a proposal that could one day save cable subscribers money.
NPR

If The FCC Gets It Way, This App Could Change The Way You Watch TV And Save Dollars

Michel Martin chats with NPR's Washington correspondent Brian Naylor about the FCC's scheduled vote this week on a proposal that could one day save cable subscribers money.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.