Lawmakers Get Earful From Constituents During Congressional Recess | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Lawmakers Get Earful From Constituents During Congressional Recess

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Federal lawmakers remain on summer break from legislating until Sept. 9. During their month long recess, lawmakers in the region are taking some vacations. But they're politicians, after all, so they're also busy fundraising and criss-crossing their states and districts to meet with voters.

Sen. Tim Kaine (D-Va.) says his constituents' frustration with Washington is coming out in a question he keeps hearing.

"Can't you guys find a path forward on a budget deal that will replace the sort of non-strategic, across-the-board, stupid sequester that's more strategic?" Kaine says.

Lawmakers such as Congressman Gerry Connolly (D-Va.) are hearing another side of that frustration.

"The biggest single concern I get is with respect to furloughs," Connolly says. "I think there's an understandable preoccupation, because we have so many folks who work for the federal government who are very concerned about the furlough status going forward."

Connolly says his constituents are also raising concerns about the possibility of a government shutdown.

While members of Congress take their summer recess, it seems some voters in the region are thinking about the heavy lifting lawmakers have ahead when they return to Washington.

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