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Anniversary Of March On Washington A Special Day For All

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Dianna Watson and Sarah Davidson, who hail from Arkansas, came to the original march when they were just 15 years old.
Patrick Madden
Dianna Watson and Sarah Davidson, who hail from Arkansas, came to the original march when they were just 15 years old.

Thousands of people braved the rainy weather and long security lines to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington today.

Sarah Davidson was a teenager living in Little Rock, Ark., when she and her friend Dianna Watson hopped on a bus and made their way to D.C. for the March on Washington in 1963.

Today, the two women were back on the National Mall, reminiscing about Dr. King's speech, the civil rights movement and a special trip to Washington 50 years ago.

"We had to do a lot of work to let our parents to get our parents to let us come here at age 15 or 16, it was just a joy to be on the bus, all the singing and laughing and the celebrating," says Watson.

The spirit of 1963 was on display all over the National Mall. From the original marchers to an eight grade class from St. Anthony Catholic School in northeast D.C., which sang songs throughout the day.

Sister Jo Ebert says it was important to bring her students to the rally and witness history.

"I think it would be so wrong to miss an occasion like this; it's good for them to see crowds for the right things," Ebert says.

One of the students, Damien Farmer, said it was a special day.

"The message is just want to get everyone together commemorate a special time in anyone's life," Farmer says. "I know most of these people were not around back then, for them to know what the history about, and how we are able to walk together, and freedom is kind of special to me."

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