D.C. Drivers Get Into Accidents Every Five Years, Ahead Of Anywhere Else | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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D.C. Drivers Get Into Accidents Every Five Years, Ahead Of Anywhere Else

D.C. drivers get into accidents—and often.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/50451021@N00/175199087
D.C. drivers get into accidents—and often.

Drivers in D.C. are often accused of being pretty terrible behind the wheel, and a new study lends some credence to that claim.

Allstate's annual assessment of the best drivers in the country's 200 largest cities again puts D.C. motorists dead last. According to the insurer, D.C. drivers get into an accident every 4.8 years, more often than the national average of 10 years and almost a decade ahead of list-leader Fort Collins, Co., where drivers only get into accidents every 13.9 years.

It's not just D.C., though: Baltimore came in second-to-last at 5.4 years between fender-benders, while motorists in Alexandria and Arlington suffered accidents every 6.2 and 6.7 years, respectively.

The usual caveats apply, though: Allstate only insures 10 percent of the country's motorists, doesn't include Massachusetts and measures how good or bad a city's drivers are only by the time that elapses between insurance claims.

In July, Slate expanded the list of factors that go into determining how terrific or terrible a driver is, and found that when fatalities, miles drives, DUIs, and pedestrian strikes are factored in, Miami motorists are the worst, followed by Philadelphia, Hialeah, Fl., Tampa, Fl., and Baltimore. D.C. improved, coming in at 16th.

It's also worth noting that Allstate's data does not specify whether the accidents it ranked were caused by D.C. drivers or merely happened in D.C., so motorists from Maryland and Virginia have to help share the blame.

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