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Half Of Virginians Want Bloomberg To Stay Away From Their Gun Laws

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Just over half of Virginia's residents think that Mayor Michael Bloomberg should keep his attention focused on the Big Apple—and off of the commonwealth's gun laws.

According to a poll conducted by Quinnipiac University, 52 percent of respondents say that Bloomberg should cease commenting on Virginia's gun laws, while 43 percent say that the General Assembly should more seriously consider his claims that many violent crimes committed in New York involve guns purchased illegally in Virginia.

Opposition to Bloomberg spiked with Republicans, men and white voters, while Democrats and black Virginians were more sympathetic with his arguments. Women were split 48-48.

“Despite all we do to keep our city safe, we’re increasingly at the mercy of weak national gun laws and weak gun laws in other states,” Bloomberg said told The New York Post earlier this month. “We have been attacking this problem from every angle, but we cannot do it alone.”

According to Bloomberg, guns from Virginia were used in 322 violent crimes in 2011. In 2007, Bloomberg sued a number of out-of-state gun dealers, including in Virginia, prompting criticism from gun advocates in the commonwealth.

The poll surveyed 1,374 registered voters with a margin of error of plus or minus 2.6 percentage points.

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