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Virginia Group Still Plans On Flying Confederate Flag Along I-95

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A Confederate flag will soon fly along I-95 south of Richmond.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/carlwain/3254170813/
A Confederate flag will soon fly along I-95 south of Richmond.

A Confederate history organization called Virginia Flaggers says it still has plans to erect its battle flag along I-95 next month despite criticism from plenty of Virginians, including the state NAACP. The group's members say all they're doing is promoting a piece of their heritage that's been gradually etched out of American history.

The 15-foot flag's intended location is south of downtown Richmond, but spokesman Barry Isenhour says they won't disclose where right now. "We've had some articles that have been written about this, on the Internet and Facebook, and we've actually had death threats," he says.

Isenhour says the group needs money, which it has been raising since the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond removed the battle flag from the Confederate War Memorial. He says to add insult to injury, the Lexington City Council also decided to remove the flags that flew from light poles on Lee-Jackson Day. Isenhour hints that this flag will fly in a place that's symbolic for Confederate soldiers and descendants.

"We know historically for a fact that Confederate soldiers fought there, and many have died in that area," he says.

Isenhour says the group hopes this is the first of several flags to be flown around Virginia. One organization, MoveOn.org, is floating a petition to stop Virginia Flaggers. They say the battle flag represents slavery and the commonwealth's dark past. Virginia Flaggers says it represents soldiers who died for an honorable cause.

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