Wal-Mart Blames Economy And Payroll Taxes For Slowed Earnings | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : News

Filed Under:

Wal-Mart Blames Economy And Payroll Taxes For Slowed Earnings

Wal-Mart is blaming depressed demand amid a still-shaky economy and a rise in payroll taxes for disappointing earnings in the quarter ending July 31.

The world's largest retailer said Thursday that its net income rose to $4.07 billion, barely above the $4.02 billion it earned in the same quarter last year.

According to Reuters, sales at U.S. stores that have been open for at least one year fell 0.3 percent.

"The retail environment was challenging across all of our markets," Wal-Mart President and CEO Mike Duke said on a conference call.

Bloomberg reports:

"Wal-Mart's sales have been hampered this year by a 2 percentage point increase in Social Security taxes that has reduced spending among its shoppers, many of whom live paycheck to paycheck. Jerry Murray, a former vice president of finance and logistics at the retailer, said in a February e-mail obtained by Bloomberg News that the sales that month had been a 'total disaster.'

" 'The 2 percent payroll tax increase continues to impact our customer,' Bill Simon, Wal-Mart's U.S. president and CEO, said in today's statement. The company also expected sales to be helped by rising grocery prices, which didn't occur in a 'meaningful way,' he said."

The increase in Social Security taxes went into effect at the first of the year after Congress let a 2009 cut — aimed at economic stimulus — expire.

The company expects net sales to increase by 2 to 3 percent instead of the 5 to 6 percent it had earlier forecast.

Meanwhile, sales at the company's international stores also decreased 2.9 percent to $33 billion.

Wal-Mart blamed "significant ongoing headwinds" related to currency exchange rates. It now expects international annual sales to rise by only 3 percent instead of the 6 percent increase it had previously forecast.

Update At 12:00 noon ET: Market Reaction

In morning trading, the news on the Arkansas-based retailer sent the company's shares down some 2 percent and help spur broader pessimism on Wall Street about the health of the economy. The Dow Jones Industrial Average tumbled more than 200 points in the first hours of trading.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Former Basketball Player Scores As A Filmmaker

While Deon Taylor was playing professional basketball in Germany, he had an epiphany: he wanted to make movies. The self-taught director's latest film, Supremacy, was released this Friday.
NPR

Surströmming Revisited: Eating Sweden's Famously Stinky Fish

Sweden has the distinction of producing surströmming, one of the foulest-smelling foods in the world. More than a decade ago, NPR's Ari Shapiro tried eating it and failed. It's time for a rematch.
NPR

What Romney's Retreat Means For GOP Hopefuls

NPR's Scott Simon speaks with senior Washington editor Ron Elving about the narrowing Republican presidential field for 2016 and what we've seen so far in the first month of the new Congress.
NPR

The Infinite Whiteness Of Public Radio Voices

The hashtag #publicradiovoices, about the "whiteness" of public radio, trended on Twitter this week. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Gene Demby of NPR's Code Switch team about the conversation.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.