Virginia Expands Agricultural Exports To China, Hong Kong | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Virginia Expands Agricultural Exports To China, Hong Kong

Play associated audio
Virginia officials went on a trade mission to Asia last year to promote agricultural goods abroad.
Matt Hannon: http://www.flickr.com/photos/74146831@N00/3960864094/
Virginia officials went on a trade mission to Asia last year to promote agricultural goods abroad.

Virginia's agriculture industry is extending its reach into Chinese markets.

China is already the leading market for the commonwealth's agricultural exports, buying approximately $638 million of farm and forest product in 2012.

Gov. Bob McDonnell says a Chinese company plans to buy 8 million bushels of soybeans from Perdue Agribusiness over the next year.

McDonnell says the agreement is the result of meetings during a trade and marketing mission to Asia last spring.

Virginia will also be sending native oysters to Hong Kong. The Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services says two Virginia shellfish growers will appear at the Asian Seafood Expo in September.

Agricultural officials say the deal could open up new business opportunities throughout Asia.

Virginia's shellfish industry sold $9.5 million in oysters in 2012. That's an increase of $3 million from 2011.

NPR

Director Mike Nichols Remembered As A Comedian, Raconteur, Charmer

Robert Siegel remembers director and film icon Mike Nichols, who died Wednesday of a heart attack at 83.
NPR

How To Catch A Cattle Thief

Cattle theft has been making a major comeback. A drought in the West has meant higher beef prices, making cattle an attractive target for thieves.
NPR

At GOP Governors Meeting, Immigration Casts A Wide Shadow

After a successful 2014 election season, the nation's GOP governors gathered to talk about policy issues and bask in their victories. But President Obama's immigration plans dominated the discussion.
NPR

Keep Your Head Up: 'Text Neck' Takes A Toll On The Spine

Newly published research finds that common texting posture can put as much as 60 pounds of force on the cervical spine.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.