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That 2012 Bundle Of Joy Will Cost You $241,080 To Raise

The United States Department of Agriculture has crunched the numbers and it concludes today that if you had a child in 2012, it'll cost you $241,080 to raise him or her for next 17 years.

If you adjust it for inflation, that number soars to $301,970.

This represents a 2.6 percent increase from 2011. The USDA reports:

"Expenses for child care, education, health care, and clothing saw the largest percentage increases related to child rearing from 2011. However, there were smaller increases in housing, food, transportation, and miscellaneous expenses during the same period. The 2.6 percent increase from 2011 to 2012 is also lower than the average annual increase of 4.4 percent since 1960."

CNN reports that despite that bit of good news, wages aren't keeping up with the increases.

"The country's median annual household income has fallen by more than $4,000 since 2000, after adjusting for inflation, and many of the jobs lost during the recent recession have been replaced with lower-wage positions," CNN reports.

We'll leave you with a cool graphic put together by the USDA:

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Dick Van Dyke: "Keep Moving"

Dick Van Dyke has been charming audiences for generations. In a new memoir, the actor explains how he stays in touch with his inner child and why life gets better the longer you live it.


King Of Beers: SABMiller Agrees In Principle To Merger With Budweiser Brewer

If the deal is formally agreed upon, the company would own around 31 percent of beer sales around the world.

Republicans Don't Want To Take Paul Ryan's 'No' For An Answer

Ryan's ability to walk a fine line between the Republican party's hardline conservative and establishment wings goes back years, and has made him "everybody's choice" to run for speaker of the House.
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Global Security Threats Posed By The Increasingly Sophisticated Tools Of Cyberwarfare

The U.S., Russia, China, Iran and North Korea have emerged as major players in the new world of cyberwarfare. With a panel of experts, we discuss global security threats posed by increasingly sophisticated malware and the new digital arms race.

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