Gansler Says Brown Relying On Race To Get Elected To Maryland's Top Office | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Gansler Says Brown Relying On Race To Get Elected To Maryland's Top Office

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Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown casting his vote in November 2012.
WAMU/Matt Bush
Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown casting his vote in November 2012.

Maryland Attorney General Doug Gansler says that Lieutenant Governor Anthony Brown, his chief rival for the Democratic nomination for governor, is relying on his race to get elected because his record of accomplishments is "thin."

Audio of Gansler speaking to a group of campaign volunteers last month was sent to the Washington Post. Gansler's camp did not deny the comments made about Brown, who's seeking to become the first African-American governor in Maryland history.

"Compare his record, which is a little thin, versus our record and pick the area of what we've done," Gansler said in the recording. "Right now, his campaign slogan is: 'Vote for me, I want to be the first African-American governor of Maryland.'"

Gansler's campaign did say they did not believe the comments would become public, and accused Brown's campaign of illegally recording them, something Brown's camp denies.

Gansler went on to say many other things on the tape, including calling Brown's selection of Howard County executive Ken Ulman as his running mate a financial choice, saying Ulman brings a "dowry" with him. 

He added that he will make his own running mate pick shortly after he formally unveils his campaign in September, and he says that person will be an African-American from either Baltimore or Prince George's County. 

Gansler's campaign is not denying anything he said on the tape, but is accusing Brown's campaign of illegally recording it. Brown's camp says it was not involved.

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