Virginia Attorney General Candidates Divided On Abortion Regulations | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Virginia Attorney General Candidates Divided On Abortion Regulations

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Mark Herring, left, is the Democratic candidate for the AG office, opposed by Mark Obenshain, right.
Mark Herring, left, is the Democratic candidate for the AG office, opposed by Mark Obenshain, right.

By the time the Falls Church Healthcare Center's legal challenge makes its way into the courtroom, Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli will no longer be in office. The next attorney general will, and he'll have to decide how to handle strict new regulations on abortion clinics in the commonwealth.

The Democrat running for that office is state Senator Mark Herring, who voted against the new regulations that hold abortion clinics to hospital construction standards. He says he's not sure if he would defend the regulations in court.

"I don't think the attorney general should be defending laws that are patently unconstitutional or where the process by which they were adopted violated the law," Herring says.

The Republican in the race, state Senator Mark Obenshain, says he will defend the strict new regulations for abortion clinics.

"Look, the job [is] just like being a private practice attorney," Obenshain says. "I go back to represent my clients and I can't decide which laws I like and which ones I don't like in representing them."

Herring is also unsure if he will defend the constitutional prohibition against gay marriage.

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