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Sick Of Traffic-Clogged Local Roads? There's An App For That

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If you are tired of getting stuck in traffic on the Beltway—and, really, who isn't?—there is an app for that!

The app is called "I'm Stuck"—and it's designed to let you send pre-written email to your Congressmen and Senators asking them to spend money to fund infrastructure projects. The app is the product of Building America's Future, a group that advocates federal spending on roads, bridges and mass transit.

Former Pennsylvania Governor Ed Rendell is the organization's co-chairman, and says the emails send the following message: "Look, I'm stuck in traffic. I am sick and tired of having an infrastructure in this country that is out of date. It's inadequate. It's dangerous, and it's hurting us economically. You guys have the power to fix it. Do it now."

Rendell says the "I'm Stuck" app is getting used in the Washington Metropolitan area, home to some of the worst traffic congestion in the country.

In Virginia, Maryland and D.C. so far, and the app has only been up a week, congressman from the area have received more than 200 emails. Nationwide, over 1,300 emails have gone out.

Rendell says he hopes a flood of emails will convince elected leaders that infrastrcuture is something that's okay to spend on.

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