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In Wake Of Trayvon Martin Case, Cardin Introduces Bill To Combat Racial Profiling

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Maryland Democratic Senator Ben Cardin is pushing legislation to combat racial profiling by law enforcement officers.

Bills to curb racial profiling have been introduced four times since 2000. They haven't gone anywhere, though. But supporters say new attention has been drawn to the issue since George Zimmerman was acquitted in the killing unarmed Florida teen Trayvon Martin.

Cardin's bill would require federal officers to undergo training on racial profiling, provide grants to the Justice Department to combat profiling, and would require localities to provide more data to the Justice Department about their investigations. Cardin says racial profiling has to stop.

"It is against our values. It's costing us resources that need to be used appropriately for keeping us safe, and it compromises the cooperation and trust between communities that need to work with local law enforcement," he says.

Michigan Democratic Congressman John Conyers introduced a companion bill to Cardin's in the House. Neither bill has garnered a Republican cosponsor as of yet.

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