Beanball Leads To Twitter Battle Between Nationals And Braves | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Beanball Leads To Twitter Battle Between Nationals And Braves

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The Washington Nationals lost to the Braves 2-1 last night in a game that featured a near-fight between the two NL East rivals. But the playing field wasn't the only place where the two teams mixed it up.

Bryce Harper's solo home run in the third inning accounted for the Nationals lone run. The next time he came to bat, Braves pitcher Julio Teheran plunked Harper in the leg with a fastball on the first pitch.

Taking very verbal exception to it, Harper shouted several obscenities at Teheran as he walked to first base. Both benches cleared, but after a few minutes of posturing, the game went on.

But the sniping then moved to cyberspace as the teams' two official Twitter accounts took shots at each other. The Braves went first, tweeting "Clown move bro," a reference to one of Harper's most famous comments. In response, the Nats tweeted, "Which part, giving up the home run, or drilling the 20-year-old on the first pitch his next time up?"

The on-field and online fireworks have a chance to continue when the teams face each other again tonight at Nationals Park.

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