A Quarter Of D.C. Area Residents Speak Language Other Than English At Home | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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A Quarter Of D.C. Area Residents Speak Language Other Than English At Home

The D.C. region's rate of people who speak languages other than English is amongst the highest on the East Coast.
Joshua Bousel: http://www.flickr.com/photos/joshbousel/197722630/
The D.C. region's rate of people who speak languages other than English is amongst the highest on the East Coast.

More than 1 in 4 residents in the Washington Metro area uses a language other than English as a primary language.

The results come as part of a report released today by the U.S. Census Bureau from their 2011 American Community Survey. Of the 5,319,973 residents in the greater National Capital Region, 26.7 percent spoke languages other than English in the home. This makes area residents more fluent than the national average — which sits at 20.8 percent.

"This study provides evidence of the growing role of languages other than English in the national fabric," said Camille Ryan, a statistician in the Census Bureau's Education and Social Stratification Branch and the report's author. "Yet, at the same time that more people are speaking languages other than English at home, the percentage of people speaking English proficiently has remained steady."

Spanish was the most popular language spoken in the home by far, accounting for more residents than all other Indo-European and Asian languages combined.

For a more granular look at what languages are spoken in which areas of the region, the Census has also released a "Language Mapper" which allows you to see the distribution of specific languages like Tagalog or French Creole.

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