A Quarter Of D.C. Area Residents Speak Language Other Than English At Home | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

A Quarter Of D.C. Area Residents Speak Language Other Than English At Home

The D.C. region's rate of people who speak languages other than English is amongst the highest on the East Coast.
Joshua Bousel: http://www.flickr.com/photos/joshbousel/197722630/
The D.C. region's rate of people who speak languages other than English is amongst the highest on the East Coast.

More than 1 in 4 residents in the Washington Metro area uses a language other than English as a primary language.

The results come as part of a report released today by the U.S. Census Bureau from their 2011 American Community Survey. Of the 5,319,973 residents in the greater National Capital Region, 26.7 percent spoke languages other than English in the home. This makes area residents more fluent than the national average — which sits at 20.8 percent.

"This study provides evidence of the growing role of languages other than English in the national fabric," said Camille Ryan, a statistician in the Census Bureau's Education and Social Stratification Branch and the report's author. "Yet, at the same time that more people are speaking languages other than English at home, the percentage of people speaking English proficiently has remained steady."

Spanish was the most popular language spoken in the home by far, accounting for more residents than all other Indo-European and Asian languages combined.

For a more granular look at what languages are spoken in which areas of the region, the Census has also released a "Language Mapper" which allows you to see the distribution of specific languages like Tagalog or French Creole.

NPR

Wounded Bull-Runner: 'If You Run Long Enough, You Get Gored'

Bill Hillmann, a writer from Chicago, contributed to the book Fiesta: How to Survive the Bulls of Pamplona. He was gored at this year's running of the bulls in that city, but says he plans to return.
NPR

What If The World Cup Were Awarded For Saving Trees And Drinking Soda?

We thought you'd get a kick out of seeing how the four teams in the final World Cup matches stack up in global health and development.
NPR

What Could $100 Million Buy You — Besides Campaign Ads In Kentucky?

Spending on the Kentucky Senate race might reach $100 million. So what else could that get you in the Bluegrass State? NPR's Tamara Keith finds out when she calls up some local business owners.
NPR

Looking For Free Sperm, Women May Turn To Online Forums

Bypassing commercial sperm banks, thousands are logging on to websites where women can connect with men at no cost. Anecdotes abound, but the scope of the unregulated activity is unclear.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.