WAMU 88.5 : News

Bay Bridge Crash Restarts Talk Of Additional Span

Play associated audio
A woman plunged into the water under the Bay Bridge in July.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/michaelfoleyphotography/4978157199/
A woman plunged into the water under the Bay Bridge in July.

Last month's crash on the Bay Bridge in Maryland, where a driver had to swim to safety after her car went into the Chesapeake Bay, is heating up old discussions about adding an additional span.

For the last decade in the General Assembly, Republican senator E.J. Pipken has pushed for a third span of the Bay Bridge — or at least money to fund a study for one. He's been denied each year, though this year the state agreed to study how much longer the bridge can last in its current state.

Last month's crash occurred when a tractor-trailer edged the car off the bridge. Appearing on WAMU's "Kojo Nnamdi Show," Pipken dismissed the idea that more policing, or even speed cameras to slow drivers, will prevent such incidents from occurring.

"Moving 28 million people over five lanes of traffic, the issues we've had with this bridge have more to do with traffic flow than driver error," Pipken said.

The car in the crash plunged 40 feet from the bridge. The driver was briefly hospitalized but suffered no serious injuries.

NPR

'The Innocent Have Nothing To Fear' Echoes Real-Life Republican Race

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Stuart Stevens, a former strategist for Mitt Romney, whose new novel, The Innocent Have Nothing to Fear, tells the story of a neck-and-neck Republican primary campaign that ends up at a brokered convention.
WAMU 88.5

How History Influences Diets In D.C. And Around The World

Kojo and chef Pati Jinich look at how history -- and famous names like El Chico, Azteca and even Fritos -- shaped modern Mexican-American cooking in the Washington region and beyond.

WAMU 88.5

Implications Of The Supreme Court's Immigration Ruling

Many undocumented immigrants are living in fear after a Supreme Court ruling effectively barred deferred deportation for 4 million people. What the ruling means for families across the country and how immigration policy is playing out in 2016 election politics.

NPR

Virtual Reality Aimed At The Elderly Finds New Fans

Some doctors are finding that virtual travel — to Venice, a Hawaiian beach or Africa — can open new worlds to people confined by low mobility, dementia, or depression.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.