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Bay Bridge Crash Restarts Talk Of Additional Span

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A woman plunged into the water under the Bay Bridge in July.
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A woman plunged into the water under the Bay Bridge in July.

Last month's crash on the Bay Bridge in Maryland, where a driver had to swim to safety after her car went into the Chesapeake Bay, is heating up old discussions about adding an additional span.

For the last decade in the General Assembly, Republican senator E.J. Pipken has pushed for a third span of the Bay Bridge — or at least money to fund a study for one. He's been denied each year, though this year the state agreed to study how much longer the bridge can last in its current state.

Last month's crash occurred when a tractor-trailer edged the car off the bridge. Appearing on WAMU's "Kojo Nnamdi Show," Pipken dismissed the idea that more policing, or even speed cameras to slow drivers, will prevent such incidents from occurring.

"Moving 28 million people over five lanes of traffic, the issues we've had with this bridge have more to do with traffic flow than driver error," Pipken said.

The car in the crash plunged 40 feet from the bridge. The driver was briefly hospitalized but suffered no serious injuries.

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