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National Cathedral Vandalism Suspect Ordered Held Without Bond

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Prosecutors say a tourist charged with defacing the Washington National Cathedral was carrying a soda can of green paint when she was arrested.

A woman identified by police as Jiamei Tian, 58, appeared in D.C. Superior court Tuesday alongside a Mandarin translator. A court document lists her name as Jia M. Tian.

Prosecutors say the 58-year-old woman arrived in Washington a few days ago and was traveling on an expired visa. Police say she had no fixed address but that she told officers she lived in Los Angeles.

She initially refused to cooperate with police and a language barrier complicated initial attempts to interview her.

She was arrested Monday at the cathedral and charged with defacing property. The cathedral's defacing followed three similar acts, including at the Lincoln Memorial, where paint was discovered Friday morning. On Tuesday, D.C. Police Chief Cathy Lanier said that she believed all the acts of vandalism were linked.

Tian will next appear in court on Friday.

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