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Judge: Verdict In Bradley Manning Trial Due Tuesday

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Army Pfc. Bradley Manning faces life in prison for leaking documents to the Wikileaks website.
(AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Army Pfc. Bradley Manning faces life in prison for leaking documents to the Wikileaks website.

A military judge says she expects to announce a verdict 1 p.m. Tuesday in the court-martial of an Army private charged with aiding the enemy for giving U.S. secrets to WikiLeaks.

Col. Denise Lind gave the heads-up notice at noon on Monday, her third day of deliberations in the trial of former intelligence analyst Pfc. Bradley Manning at Fort Meade. Manning faces a possible life sentence if convicted of the charge.

The 25-year-old also faces 20 other counts, including espionage, computer fraud and theft for admittedly sending hundreds of thousands of classified documents and some battlefield video to the anti-secrecy website while working as an intelligence analyst in Iraq.

In closing arguments last week, the defense portrayed Manning as a naive whistleblower who wanted to expose war crimes. Prosecutors call him an anarchist hacker and a traitor.

Following the verdict, the trial will end with the sentencing phase, when both sides will present testimony and debate on what attorneys feel would be the appropriate sentence given the verdict.

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