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Woman Arrested For Green Paint Vandalism At National Cathedral

Police Looking For Links To Other Acts Of Vandalism

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A National Cathedral organ was found splattered with green paint Monday.
James Walsh: http://www.flickr.com/photos/jcbwalsh/3743745297/
A National Cathedral organ was found splattered with green paint Monday.

Police have arrested a woman they believe is responsible for splashing green paint on an organ in the Bethlehem Chapel in the National Cathedral. This came just three days after paint was found splattered at the Lincoln Memorial and on the same day that paint was found on two other statues in D.C.

The suspect, 58-year-old Jiamei Tian, was found near the organ with paint on her clothing and hands, according to NBC Washington, and she was arrested without incident. She has been charged with defacing property.

Paint was first discovered on the Lincoln Memorial on Friday, and on Monday morning green paint was found on a statue memorializing Joseph Henry, the first secretary of the Smithsonian Institution. Unlike at the Lincoln Memorial, the paint on the Henry statue resembled finger painting—complete with stick figures of people.

Later on Monday, paint was found strewn strewn across the organ in the National Cathedral's Bethlehem Chapel and on a statue of Martin Luther in Thomas Circle.

Police are investigating if the four incidents are connected, and in the meantime, it will be a few days before the paint is removed from the National Cathedral and the two statues.

The union representing the U.S. Park Police, which patrols large swaths of Washington's federal core and memorials, says that the acts of vandalism underscore the need for additional officers on the beat.

"While I don't want to say that sequestration played a role in this particular incident, what it does play a role in is the fact that there are fewer officers to protect the areas and we've been asking for increased funding and staffing," said Ian Glick, the union's president.

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