Senate Committee Passes Employment Non-Discrimination Act | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Senate Committee Passes Employment Non-Discrimination Act

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Supporters of legislation to combat discrimination based on sexual orientation say momentum is building in the Senate, but they're worried it will die in the House.

Since 1994, the Employment Non-Discrimination Act has been introduced in every congressional session expect one. Bipartisan support in one committee has already approved the measure, and supporters say momentum is growing ahead of it hitting the Senate floor.

Northern Virginia Rep. Jim Moran says the bill's time has come.

"This Congress needs to get with the program," says Moran. "It's tough to get too far right of the Supreme Court."

Even with public and congressional support growing, the bill isn't expected to go anywhere in the House, which Moran says will come back to hurt the GOP.

"And so age is on the side of progress," he says. "But the Republican majority still isn't, and I think it's going to take probably another four years for the demographic changes to be reflected."

The Senate leader has yet to schedule the legislation for a vote.

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