Premium Rates Set For Maryland Health Exchange | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Premium Rates Set For Maryland Health Exchange

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Coverage plans under Maryland's new health care exchange — a key component of the federal Affordable Care Act — will be among the cheapest in the country.

The state health insurance commissioner Therese Goldsmith announced that the premium rates for coverage plans that will be offered on the exchange will be up to a third cheaper than what was requested by health insurance companies.

The exchange, which will officially be called Maryland Health Connection, goes live later this year on October 1, with health plans purchased on the site taking effect on January 1 of next year at the earliest.

Smith says the lower premiums mean coverage plans for a 21-year-old non-smoker will start as low as $93 a month. Smith adds four factors will go into forming the rate each individual will pay per month under any health plan depending on the carrier they choose: their age, the area the person lives in, how many people will be covered under the plan, and whether the person uses tobacco.

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