At Least 36 Killed In Italy Tour Bus Crash | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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At Least 36 Killed In Italy Tour Bus Crash

A tour bus in Italy plunged off of a ravine and killed at least 36 people on board, according to police and rescuers.

The bus reportedly slammed into several cars that had slowed because of heavy traffic before falling dozens of feet and crashing into the ravine.

The Associated Press reports that it looked as if the bus was split open, and local police were quoted as saying the driver was also killed.

"Hours after the crash, firefighters said that so far they had pulled out 36 bodies and 11 injured people from the mangled wreckage of the bus, which lie on side in a clearance in a wooded area near a road after smashing through a guardrail and plunging some 30 meters (100 feet) below, the Italian news agency ANSA said."

The New York Times reports that the bus was traveling from Telese Terme in Campania back to the town of Giugliano, outside Naples. Italian media is saying there might be children among the dead.

One witness told a local news station that it sounded as if the bus had blown a tire. A local prosecutor arrived at the crash scene to begin an investigation into the cause of the crash.

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