WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Musical Score From 'The Legend of Zelda' To Perform In Baltimore

Play associated audio
A full orchestra performs The Legend of Zelda: Symphony of the Goddesses, a touring concert produced by Jason Michael Paul Productions with a musical score approved by Nintendo sound director and Zelda franchise composer, Koji Kondo.
Andrew Craig
A full orchestra performs The Legend of Zelda: Symphony of the Goddesses, a touring concert produced by Jason Michael Paul Productions with a musical score approved by Nintendo sound director and Zelda franchise composer, Koji Kondo.

The video game The Legend of Zelda was first released by Nintendo in the 1980s. During the nearly 30-year history of the Zelda franchise, Nintendo has released a number of sequels, growing an ever-ardent fan base.

And now, fans of the game can step away from their consoles and enjoy the cultural icon on a whole new level. The Legend of Zelda: Symphony of the Goddesses is a touring concert that comes to Meyerhoff Symphony Hall in Baltimore tonight. Executive Producer Jason Michael Paul says it's the first time a four-movement symphony has been created for a video game.

"It's never been done the way that we've done it," he says. "We have a 66-piece orchestra. We have a 24-voice choir. It's almost 100 musicians on stage."

The concert also features visual accompaniment from the game. Chris Melissinos, the guest curator for The Art of Video Games exhibition, which originally showed last year at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, says video games are one of the most inclusive and comprehensive forms of art.

"When you look at video games, within them you can see illustration, composition, narrative, orchestration, sculpture," he says, "all of these things that if we remove them, the individual component, then put it on a pedestal or hang it on a wall in a museum we say 'ok, that's art.'"

Melissinos says that music is an integral part of the video game experience.

"Take the musical score out of a movie, tension is gone. Heightened awareness is gone. Action is gone," he says. "The music fills in that additional voice that describes to the observer what is happening in the space and how they should react to it."

Both Paul and Melissinos say you don't have to be a Zelda fan to enjoy the music.

"This is just a spectacle. It's something to be seen," Paul says. "You walk away with an appreciation for the game and also the artistry of video games."

The current production isn't the same show that starting touring two years ago, but rather an adapted version that reflects new developments in the Zelda franchise.

The Legend of Zelda: Symphony of the Goddesses is produced by Jason Michael Paul Productions and features an orchestral score approved by Nintendo sound director and Zelda franchise composer, Koji Kondo.

NPR

Bonjour, Barbie! An American Icon Packs Her Heels And Heads To France

Some 700 Barbie dolls are visiting Paris this summer. They span almost six decades of pretty, plastic history, including Malibu Barbie, astronaut Barbie, and, of course, Royal Canadian Mountie Barbie.
NPR

Domino's Pizza Tests Drone Delivery In New Zealand

Don't expect the service soon. The head of a drone company told Reuters they have to figure out how to navigate "random hazards like power lines, moving vehicles and children in the backyard playing."
NPR

All Mixed Up: What Do We Call People Of Multiple Backgrounds?

The share of multiracial children in America has multiplied tenfold in the past 50 years. It's a good time to take stock of our shared vocabulary when it comes to describing Americans like me.
WAMU 88.5

A Cyber-Psychologist Explains How Human Behavior Changes Online

Dr. Mary Aiken, a pioneering cyber-psychologist, work inspired the CBS television series "CSI: Cyber". She explains how going online changes our behavior in small and dramatic ways, and what that means for how we think about our relationship with technology.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.