Lawmakers Debating How To Reform 'No Child Left Behind' | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Lawmakers Debating How To Reform 'No Child Left Behind'

Lawmakers on Capitol Hill are debating how best to reform No Child Left Behind. At the end of last week House Republicans ushered through some sweeping reforms to the measure. Their bill would cut federal education funding by about $1 billion, while also removing a lot of the federal checks on local school systems.

Republicans say educators across the U.S. are clamoring to regain more control of their own school systems. The legislation failed to garner a single Democratic supporter. The Senate is moving ahead with its own rewrite of the law that seeks to retain a strong federal role in education.

Virginia Democratic Rep. Bobby Scott says many localities still need pressure from the federal government.

"The federal role in education is really to specifically help those areas that are not generally covered like low income areas, bilingual education, special education, groups that would generally be left behind if the federal government didn't step in.," he says.

It's still unclear when the Senate will take up its education bill, but it will have to be reconciled with the House version, which is facing a veto threat from the president leaving Congress with yet another issue where the two parties are worlds apart from each other.

NPR

Adding Color To 'The Great White Way'

NPR's Michel Martin asks a panel of award-winning playwrights how diverse artists are challenging Broadway's landscape, and whether it matters.
NPR

Syrup Induces Pumpkin-Spiced Fever Dreams

Hugh Merwin, an editor at Grub Street, bought a 63-ounce jug of pumpkin spice syrup and put it in just about everything he ate for four days. As he tells NPR's Scott Simon, it did not go well.
NPR

Man Caught At White House Is An Army Veteran

Omar J. Gonzales, the 42-year-old man who the Secret Service says ran onto the White House grounds and entered a door Friday night, is an Army veteran who served in Iraq.
NPR

Drivers, Passengers Say Uber App Doesn't Always Yield Best Routes

People love Uber, but they often complain the Uber app's built-in navigation doesn't give its drivers the best directions. The company says the app helps drivers and passengers travel efficiently.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.