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Gray To Decide Fate Of D.C.'s 'Living Wage' Bill

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The fate of the living wage bill targeting big box retailers like Walmart is now up to Mayor Vincent Gray.
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The fate of the living wage bill targeting big box retailers like Walmart is now up to Mayor Vincent Gray.

It's been nearly two weeks since the D.C. Council approved a bill requiring large retailers like Walmart to pay its employees $12.50 an hour.

But according to D.C. Council Chairman Phil Mendelson, it could take awhile for Gray to officially receive the bill.

"I expect the bill will get to the mayor in the next several weeks," he says.

Mendelson, speaking on WAMU's The Politics Hour, says its not unusual for it to take that long.

"There's a lot that goes on, it's an enrollment process, there's a lot of record keeping," he says.

The extra time gives supporters and opponents of the law more opportunities to make their case to Mayor Gray.

If the mayor vetoes the bill, as many expect, the council gets one more shot. It requires nine votes to override a veto. Eight members voted for the legislation, meaning supporters would need to find one council member to flip.

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