'No Labels' Group Aiming To Make Congress More Efficient | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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'No Labels' Group Aiming To Make Congress More Efficient

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Gridlock has defined this Congress. Yet even amongst all the partisan muck and mire, a bipartisan effort is emerging to make the government more efficient.

The group No Labels is honing in on nine bills leaders say will make Washington run more smoothly, including ending duplication in federal agencies, moving to a two-year budgeting process and improving the health system at the VA, where thousands of veterans' disability claims remain backlogged.

Virginia Republican Rep. Scott Rigell says many of these proposals will go a long way in helping the federal government operate more smoothly.

"I really believe the government needs to be more limited in scope, and the essential operations that it is performing need to be more efficiently run," says Rigell.

Still, Rigell admits these bipartisan proposals don't go as far as he'd like.

"We'll look it's the start of something," she says. "And like any great avalanche of change, it all starts with the pebble."

Other lawmakers in the region are also supporting the effort, including Democrats John Delaney of Maryland and Jim Moran of Northern Virginia.

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