With Heat Peaking, Doctors Warn Residents To Watch For Water Loss | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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With Heat Peaking, Doctors Warn Residents To Watch For Water Loss

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It's hot today—really hot—so drink a lot of water.
It's hot today—really hot—so drink a lot of water.

The heat wave baking the region is here for another day—and today may be the week's hottest day.

Prince George's Hospital Doctor Doug Mayo says it's important to keep hydrated and be aware of warning signs of water loss.

"Symptoms could be dry mouth, increased thirst. Decreased urine output, headache, maybe some lightheadedness. Little bit of what may describe as dizziness," he says.

Mayo says these symptoms could be a sign of something more serious.

"Heat related illness is another kind of a spectrum of what we call mild heat exhaustion being some of the similar symptoms to what we see with dehydration all the way to the more severe cases like heat stroke where there's actually neurologic damage."

Young children and the elderly are the most at risk for dehydration and other heat related illnesses.

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