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Group To March 100 Miles To White House To Protest Inaction On Climate Change

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A group of environmental activists are marching from Camp David, Maryland to the White House to protest the lack of federal action in combating climate change.

The group chose mid-July for the 100-mile walk—called "The Walk For Our Grandchildren"—because these days are traditionally the hottest of the year in our region. The weather certainly has not disappointed the activists, who range in age from 11 to 78.

Mike Tidwell of the Chesapeake Climate Action Network points out says that levels of the greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide, currently measured in the earth's air are higher than they've ever been since long before the first humans lived.

"We have now reached what scientists say is an extreme danger status of 400 parts per million carbon in the atmosphere—there has not been that much carbon pollution in our sky for three million years," he says.

The walk aims to draw attention to national issues like fracking and the Keystone XL pipeline, but also addresses touch on local energy controversies. Ann Marie Nau will walk in protest of a compressor station Dominion Power is trying to build in Myersville, Maryland.

"Annually the compressor station will release 88 tons of emissions," she says.

The local town council unanimously opposed the project, but Dominion is challenging the ruling, since the station was approved by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.

The walk kicks off on July 22 and is expected to end five days later.

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