Judge In Wikileaks Case Rejects Motion To Dismiss Aiding The Enemy Charge | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Judge In Wikileaks Case Rejects Motion To Dismiss Aiding The Enemy Charge

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Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, center, is escorted into a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md.
(AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, center, is escorted into a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md.

Judge Denise Lind has rejected a request to dismiss a critical charge against Army Pfc. Bradley Manning.

The defense motion to drop the charge of aiding the enemy was rejected, according to the judge, because of Manning's extensive training.

In her ruling, Lind said that training would give Bradley Manning the ability to recognize that the Internet was being used by terrorist organizations to gain information and to secure advantage against enemies. She also cited a presentation that Manning made to his unit wherein he warned about the dangers of posting information to the Internet.

Lind also denied a motion to find Manning not-guilty of exceeding his computer authorization.

The ruling means that Manning could spend life in prison if found guilty. Afterwards the prosecution began recalling to the stand a limited number of witnesses to rebut earlier testimony from the defense.

The last of the witnesses could be called today or tomorrow and closing arguments will begin.

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