WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Concession Workers At Union Station Demand Higher Wages

As Walmart and others wait to see if Mayor Gray will veto the D.C. Council's "living wage" bill, workers at some of the city's most famous federal buildings are trying to raise awareness about low wages.

A loud protest took place outside Union Station this morning, where dozens of concession workers walked off the job and held a rally demanding better pay from vendors in federal buildings.

Today's action follows similar walk-offs and protests at federal buildings in D.C. in recent weeks. Earlier this month, it was the Reagan Building, and then the Smithsonian.

The protestors at the rally, which included D.C. Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, want President Obama to sign an executive order mandating livable wages of at least $12 an hour for federally contracted service workers.

Norton says Union Station is giving shelter to wealthy corporations by not requiring a living wage, and says the government ends up picking up the tab by paying for the workers' healthcare and other benefits like food stamps.

NPR

'We're Mostly Republicans': New Hampshire Voters Explained By 'Our Town'

After NPR's Bob Mondello used The Music Man to help explain the Iowa caucuses, he wished there was a musical of Our Town so he could do the same for New Hampshire. It turns out there is one.
NPR

Gulf Of Mexico Open For Fish-Farming Business

For the first time, companies can apply to set up fish farms in U.S. federal waters. The government says the move will help reduce American dependence on foreign seafood and improve security.
WAMU 88.5

What's Behind Trends In U.S. Violent Crime Rates

FBI data suggest there was a slight uptick in violent crime in the first half of last year, but overall violent crime rates in the U.S. have dropped dramatically over the last twenty years. What led to the long-term decline, and why do some say it’s likely to continue?

WAMU 88.5

Blocked: Twitter's Role In Combating Violent Extremism

Over the course of seven months, Twitter has suspended over 125,000 accounts for threatening or promoting terrorist acts.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.