'American Journalism Review' To Quit Printing; Go Online-Only | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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'American Journalism Review' To Quit Printing; Go Online-Only

Newspapers have done it.

Magazines too.

Now there's another very symbolic sign of how numbered the days seem to be for much of the "print" media:

The University of Maryland's American Journalism Review "will end production of its print edition and launch a redesigned website in Fall 2013 as it becomes an online-only publication."

"The model for publishing has clearly shifted to digital formats as online readership has grown," Dean Lucy A. Dalglish of the university's Philip Merrill College of Journalism says in a statement released with that announcement.

"It no longer made financial sense for the award-winning AJR to continue producing a print magazine because most AJR readers accessed content on the Web," she adds. "In addition, philanthropy has long been an important source of funding for print magazines devoted to media criticism. That support has steadily declined over the past 10 years."

AJR adds that:

"The original Washington Journalism Review was founded in 1977 by American University graduate student Roger Kranz. In 1979 it was purchased by Ambassador Henry Catto and his wife, Jessica. WJR came to [the University of Maryland] in 1987 thanks to the efforts of then-Dean Reese Cleghorn. Just one year after Rem Rieder became editor in 1992, the publication was renamed the American Journalism Review. ...

"Originally published 11 times per year with a large staff, it ultimately moved to three issues per year and in the last two years had an editor, part-time copy editor and free-lance writers and designers."

Rieder left AJR in July to become an editor at USA Today.

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