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Zimmerman Juror Signs With Book Agent

One of the women on the jury that found George Zimmerman not guilty on Saturday has already signed with a book agent.

According to Reuters, literary agent Sharlene Martin said Monday that the juror "hopes to write a book explaining why the all-women panel had 'no option' but to find Zimmerman not guilty of murder."

Known now only as "Juror B37," the woman is a mother of two. According to Fox News, she is "in her 50s [and] has lived in Seminole County for eight years. She has been married for almost 20 years and her husband is a 'space attorney,' who worked with the Shuttle company United Space Alliance."

Gawker has posted video of the voir dire — the questioning of Juror B37 during jury selection. Among the things she said during that questioning:

-- That she "knew there was rioting" in Sanford, Fla., after the 17-year-old Trayvon Martin's death. As Gawker points out, "in fact, despite a great deal of salivating anticipation by the media both before and after the trial, there were no riots in Sanford, Florida."

-- That she gets her news from NBC's The Today Show and does not listen to the radio, read the Web or read newspapers. She believes the news media is "skewed one way or the other."

-- When asked to describe Trayvon, she referred to him as a "boy of color."

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