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Snowden Has NSA 'Blueprint,' Says 'Guardian' Journalist

Glenn Greenwald, the Guardian journalist who was the first to report on classified documents leaked by Edward Snowden, says the former National Security Agency contractor has what amounts to an "instruction manual for how the NSA is built."

Greenwald made the comments in a Sunday interview with The Associated Press.

Greenwald told the AP that if Snowden were to release those documents, they would "allow somebody who read them to know exactly how the NSA does what it does, which would in turn allow them to evade that surveillance or replicate it."

He added: "In order to take documents with him that proved that what he was saying was true, he had to take ones that included very sensitive, detailed blueprints of how the NSA does what they do."

In an earlier interview with Argentina's La Nacion, Greenwald said that Snowden could cause immense damage to the United States with some of the documents but "that's not his goal."

Snowden is still stranded in Moscow, with the U.S. working hard to extradite him. As Mark reported Friday, Snowden said he was seeking temporary asylum in Russia. Bolivia, Nicaragua and Venezuela have all offered him asylum.

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NPR

Writer James Alan McPherson, Winner Of Pulitzer, MacArthur And Guggenheim, Dies At 72

McPherson, the first African-American to win the Pulitzer Prize for fiction, has died at 72. His work explored the intersection of white and black lives with deftness, subtlety and wry humor.
NPR

Oyster Archaeology: Ancient Trash Holds Clues To Sustainable Harvesting

Modern-day oyster populations in the Chesapeake are dwindling, but a multi-millennia archaeological survey shows that wasn't always the case. Native Americans harvested the shellfish sustainably.

WAMU 88.5

Your Turn: Ronald Reagan's Shooter, Freddie Gray Verdicts And More

Have opinions about the Democratic National Convention, or the verdicts from the Freddie Gray cases? It's your turn to talk.

NPR

Writing Data Onto Single Atoms, Scientists Store The Longest Text Yet

With atomic memory technology, little patterns of atoms can be arranged to represent English characters, fitting the content of more than a billion books onto the surface of a stamp.

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