Cleveland Fan Grabs 4 Foul Balls At Indians Game | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio
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Cleveland Fan Grabs 4 Foul Balls At Indians Game

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Greg Van Niel is a Cleveland Indians season-ticket holder. But curiously, he wasn't sitting in his usual seat when he grabbed four foul balls at Sunday's game at Progressive Field against the Kansas City Royals.

He accomplished his feat by the fifth inning while sitting in Row FF, Section 160, Seat 3.

"Three of them were catches, and one was a ball I picked up off the ground," Van Niel told the team, according to tribevibe on mlblogs.com.

"The third one I think was the hardest one. I think I ended up sprawled across a few rows, and I got some cheese on myself. But the other ones were just a matter of being in the right place at the right time," he said.

Cleveland's Plain Dealer, quoting tribevibe, reports that Van Niel kept the first three balls and flipped the fourth to nearby fans.

And, he said he plans to try to get that seat for next year's season.

Maybe Van Niel was a good luck charm for the Indians — they defeated the Royals 6-4.

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