Band 'Guster' Goes Green At Merriweather | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Band 'Guster' Goes Green At Merriweather

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Going green has been a trend for just about every aspect of life, and now it's hitting the music scene. Adam Gardner, a guitarist and vocalist for the band Guster, knows an environmentally sustainable concert experience isn't what fans are thinking about when they go to a show.

"This is about fun," he says. "No one is there to learn anything. They're there to relax."

But Gardner feels getting a message through can still be fun. They're doing it by going right to the fans on this tour at a so-called "eco tent," complete with a solar-powered stage where they play an acoustic show between the sets of headliners Ben Folds Five and Barenaked Ladies.

There, Guster fans can "go green" by "growing green" — by getting a very unusual concert giveaway.

"It's a tour-branded seed packet," he says. "It's basil. You can plant it on your windowsill and grow your own herbs at home."

Gardner adds they're putting more focus on this tour on their instruments, namely the wood they're made of. He testified before Congress two years ago in support of a law targeting illegal logging of timber in countries like Madagascar that has been used to make guitars.

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