College Student Andrew Pochter Eulogized At National Cathedral | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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College Student Andrew Pochter Eulogized At National Cathedral

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The Chevy Chase college student killed during protests in Egypt last month was eulogized at a private service at the National Cathedral today.

Andrew Pochter, 21, was teaching English to Egyptian kids when he was killed by a protester during clashes between supporters and opponents of then-Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi.

His sister, Emily, read a letter her brother sent to a Baltimore inner city youth he had been mentoring for several years. Pochter wrote it days before his death.

"What is most important is that I am trying to do my best for others, Pochter wrote. "I want to surround myself with good people. I did not come up with this personal philosophy on my own. Without thoughtful and caring people like you, I would probably be a mean and grumpy person. I hope that you will never stop your curiosity for the beautiful things in life."

Pochter was majoring in religious studies at Kenyon college and was interested in fostering peace in the Middle East.

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