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Marion Barry Censured For Accepting Gifts From Contractors

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Marion Barry has been censured by the D.C. Council.
Marion Barry has been censured by the D.C. Council.

The "Mayor for Life" is once again in trouble. D.C. Council member Marion Barry (D-Ward 8) has been censured and fined nearly $14,000 by the city's ethics board for accepting unlawful gifts from a pair of contractors.

City law prohibits lawmakers from accepting gifts over $20,000 from contractors doing business with the city. Barry accepted nearly $7,000.

The council member reported the gifts on his financial disclosure form, but did not inform the council chairman or initially recuse himself from matters involving the two companies.

The firms — Forney Enterprises and F & L Construction — have received city contracts worth millions of dollars.

The owner of one of the companies has said he gave Barry $2,800 to help pay his bills.

The former four-term mayor admitted to the wrongdoing, and the action taken by the board was part of a negotiated settlement. Barry was also censured by the D.C. Council in 2010 for violating conflict of interest rules when awarded a contract to his then-girlfriend.

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