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D.C. Could Run Out Of Scratch-Off Lottery Tickets

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Scratch-off lottery tickets may soon become a rare commodity in the District.
Justin Dessonville: http://www.flickr.com/photos/iamdez/4692030303/
Scratch-off lottery tickets may soon become a rare commodity in the District.

The D.C. Council has rejected a proposed contract to provide scratch-off lottery tickets, meaning the District may temporarily run out of instant tickets.

That comes according to a spokesman for the District's Office of the Chief Financial Officer, according to the Associated Press. David Umansky says the city has instant tickets in warehouses and will sell its remaining stock. He says he's not sure how long the supply will last, but that it's sure to run out in the six months it will take to rebid the contract.

The current contract with Scientific Games International expires on July 20.

The council rejected the new $9.7 million contract awarded to Scientific Games because it didn't comply with a city law that requires 35 percent of major contracts go to local businesses.

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