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Libertarian Activist Arrested After Loading Shotgun During D.C. Protest

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Kokesh is seen hearing loading a shotgun in D.C.'s Freedom Plaza.
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Kokesh is seen hearing loading a shotgun in D.C.'s Freedom Plaza.

Adam Kokesh, the Virginia man who wanted gun owners to march on Washington with loaded guns as part of a new American Revolution, is behind bars this morning after an act of civil disobedience on Independence Day.

On that day, Kokesh appeared on video in D.C.'s Freedom Plaza, where he loaded a shotgun as part of a protest for gun rights in the nation's capital. Carrying guns in D.C. is illegal.

The video prompted action that same day by the U.S. Park Police, says Sergeant Paul Brooks. Late Tuesday night U.S. Park Police served a search warrant on Kokesh's Herndon home and arrested the Iraq war veteran on gun and drug charges.

In May Kokesh had urged gun owners to march on Washington with their loaded firearms on July4, but he cancelled that civil disobedience  march after being warned by D.C. officals that any protester carrying a firearm would be subject to arrest. Kokesh instead posted the video of himself loading his shotgun.

He is now at the Fairfax County Adult Detention Center.

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