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Defense Rests In Trial Of Bradley Manning

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Army Pfc. Bradley Manning is escorted out of a courthouse  in Fort Meade, Md. Manning is charged with indirectly aiding the enemy by sending troves of classified material to WikiLeaks. He faces up to life in prison.
AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana
Army Pfc. Bradley Manning is escorted out of a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md. Manning is charged with indirectly aiding the enemy by sending troves of classified material to WikiLeaks. He faces up to life in prison.

The defense has rested its case in the court-martial of Pfc. Bradley Manning, who leaked loads of classified information to the website WikiLeaks.

Harvard law professor Yochai Benkler was the final witness for the defense. Benkler says Wikileaks represents a new and legitimate type of journalism in a recently-expanded field of news reporting. Benkler claims that Wikileaks was only publicly condemned after they released the documents given them by Bradley Manning.

David Coombs stood up and announced that the defense rests. This came as something as a surprise, since the defense only began its case on Monday and suggested they would call as many as 20 additional witnesses.

Manning is contesting 21 charges, including aiding the enemy, which carries a possible life sentence.

He has acknowledged giving the anti-secrecy group hundreds of thousands of battlefield reports and State Department cables while working as an intelligence analyst in Iraq. He says he wanted to expose wrongdoing.

Prosecutors say they will call rebuttal witnesses on Monday, when the trial reconvenes.

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