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Bethesda, Gaithersburg And Frederick Top List Of America's Safest Places To Live

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Where's the safest place to live in America? It's not far.

The communities of Bethesda, Gaithersburg and Frederick, Maryland ranked at the top of a new list of America's safest places to live.

The list, compiled by researchers at Sperling's BestPlaces and published by Farmers Insurance Group, looked at data from large metropolitan areas with a population of 500,000 or more.

Criteria included economic stability, crime statistics, extreme weather, risk of natural disasters, housing depreciation, foreclosures, air quality, environmental hazards, life expenctancy, motor vehicle fatalities and employment numbers.

“Our most secure large metropolitan areas are islands of security in our challenging times,” said Bert Sperling, president of Sperling’s BestPlaces.

“Some have a stable economy due to their local colleges and seats of government, and some may be fortunate that their locale is not prone to hurricanes, tornadoes or earthquakes. Although each metropolitan area is different, they all possess a desirable combination of factors (jobs, low crime rates, housing, climate, health, reduced levels of natural disasters) that make these some of the best places to live in the United States.”

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