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Body Of Missing Seven-Year-Old Boy Recovered

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D.C. police found the body of a seven-year-old autistic boy who had been missing since Sunday morning.

The discovery on Monday afternoon was a tragic ending in the search of Michael Kingsbury, the seven-year-old boy who went missing from his home Sunday in Northeast D.C.

Assistant Police Chief Peter Newsham said that Kingsbury's body was discovered late Monday afternoon in an abandoned car on the block where he lived.

"We found the body of a child, a male child whose description is consistent with the missing child in the area and he was found inside a vehicle located on a property in the rear of the 1700 block of West Virginia," he said.

The car had no plates, though police say they have questioned its owner.

Before the body had been discovered, officers canvassed the neighborhood and interviewed local registered sex offenders. They searched abandoned sheds and buildings, but Kingsbury's body was ultimately found only yards from the home he had lived in.

"It's one of the unfortunate things when you're looking for a small child, there are a number of small places and crevices and places where they conceal themselves," said Newsham.

An autopsy will be conducted to determine the cause of death.

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