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Murray Beats Djokovic To Win Men's Title At Wimbledon

Andy Murray broke Britain's more than seven decade men's title drought at Wimbledon on Sunday, beating top seed Novak Djokovic in straight sets.

Murray won 6-4, 7-5, 6-4 in a hard-fought 3-hour, 9-minute match, which the Associated Press noted, was "filled with long, punishing rallies and a final game that may have felt like another 77 years, with Murray squandering three match points before finally putting it away after four deuces."

Here's more from the AP:

"On a cloudless, 80-degree day on Centre Court, Murray put his name beside that of Fred Perry, the last British man to win Wimbledon, back in 1936.

"That sentence doesn't have to be written again.

"The second-seeded Murray beat the best in Djokovic, a six-time Grand Slam winner known for both a mental and physical fitness built to handle what he faced Sunday: A crowd full of 15,000 partisans rooting against him, to say nothing of Murray himself, who, since falling to Roger Federer in the final last year, had shed some baggage by winning the Olympic gold medal on Centre Court, then following that with his first Grand Slam title at the U.S. Open."

As we reported Saturday, France's Marion Bartoli won the women's title.

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