WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Cuccinelli Says Legal Changes To Voting Rights Act Necessary

Play associated audio

Even before the Supreme Court decision to suspend parts of the Voting Rights Act, Virginia's General Assembly made changes to the state's election law. Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli says some of those bills passed earlier this year are needed.

Some new laws require more oversight of voter registration rolls, including routine checks to identify felons. But on the minds of many is whether or not people are fraudulently casting ballots. Such allegations made in different regions of the state prompted the assembly to enable the attorney general to investigate potential fraud.

Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli says some circumstances would make it difficult to prosecute criminal activity without this law.

"When you do have active election law violations going on that cross jurisdictional boundaries, there's no prosecutorial authority in Virginia prior to this bill passing that had authority to step in and participate in the investigation," he says.

A situation in neighboring Maryland in which a congressional candidate was found guilty of voting in two states reinforced a need for the new law that allows Virginia to cross-reference voters with other states, to make sure they're not casting ballots in more than one jurisdiction. And to reassure people that their vote is being counted, a free voter access system is being created that allows them to verify the status of an absentee ballot.

NPR

'Theeb' Looks At Middle East History Through The Eyes Of A Bedouin Boy

The Oscar-nominated film is set in 1916 Saudi Arabia, a pivotal time in the region. Director Naji Abu Nowar says he wanted to explore "how strange and surreal it must have been" for the Bedouins.
NPR

Beer And Snack Pairings: A Super Bowl Game Everyone Can Win

Which beer goes with guacamole? How can a brew complement spicy wings? Two craft beer experts share their favorite pairings and help us take our Super Bowl snack game to the next level.
NPR

#MemeOfTheWeek: Bernie Or Hillary. Sexist or Nah?

A series of fake campaign posters locking Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton was just supposed to be funny, said the meme's creator. Except a lot of people thought it was sexist.
NPR

Twitter Says It Has Shut Down 125,000 Terrorism-Related Accounts

The announcement comes just weeks after a woman sued Twitter, saying the platform knowingly let ISIS use the network "to spread propaganda, raise money and attract recruits."

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.