WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Large Slate Of Public Safety Laws Take Effect In Virginia

Play associated audio

Nearly two dozen new or altered public safety laws took effect in Virginia this week. Some may go unnoticed, but lawmakers hope their work does make life in the Commonwealth better for most residents.

The laws include tougher penalties against Internet identity thieves and those who prey on the elderly and mentally incapacitated. There are 19 added felonies to the gang predicate criminal statute, and 25 more felonies to the list of those deemed violent for purposes of sentencing. And new law enforcement tools exist for multiple cases of abusive stalking.

Del. Jennifer McClellan says it took eight years and several tragedies beginning with the death of De'Nora Hill before lawmakers could reach a consensus:

"After that we lost Yeardley Love, and then last year, Tiffany Green," McClellan says. "And Tiffany's mother, Sheila, called my office and said, 'What do we need to do to get this bill passed?'"

First responders can now cross barriers or buffers to enter High-Occupancy Toll lanes without being cited. And for certain crimes where mandatory minimum sentences are imposed, the time served will run consecutively not concurrently.

NPR

Credibility Concerns Overshadow Release Of Gay Talese's New Book

NPR's Kelly McEvers speaks with Paul Farhi of the Washington Post about Gay Talese's new book, The Voyeur's Hotel. The credibility of the book, which follows a self-proclaimed sex researcher who bought a hotel to spy on his guests through ventilator windows, has been called into question after Farhi uncovered problems with Talese's story.
NPR

Amid Craft Brewery Boom, Some Worry About A Bubble — But Most Just Fear Foam

Fueled by customers' unquenchable thirst for the next great flavor note, the craft beer industry has exploded like a poorly fermented bottle of home brew.
NPR

White House Documents Number Of Civilians Killed In U.S. Drone Strikes

The Obama administration issued a long awaited report Friday, documenting the number on civilians who have been accidentally killed by U.S. drone strikes. Human rights activists welcome the administration's newfound transparency, though some question whether the report goes far enough.
NPR

Tesla 'Autopilot' Crash Raises Concerns About Self-Driving Cars

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is investigating a fatal crash involving a Tesla car using the "autopilot" feature. NPR's Robert Siegel talks to Alex Davies of Wired about the crash and what it means for self-driving car technology.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.